New Rules for Emergency Engines

New Rules for Emergency Engines

May 27, 2016
As of May 4, 2016, back-up engines continuing to operate under emergency demand response will be considered non-emergency engines and must meet the regulatory requirements including numerical emission limits, or work practice standards, notifications, and performance testing that may apply. .

Vacatur of RICE NESHAP and NSPS for Stationary Compression Ignition and Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Standards Operating Under Emergency Demand Response

A 2013 amendment of the RICE rules allowed emergency engines to operate for emergency demand response when (1) the Reliability Coordinator had declared an Energy Emergency Alert Level 2, or (2) when there was a deviation of voltage or frequency of five percent or greater below standard voltage or frequency for up to 100 hours per year.  On May 1, 2015 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District Court of Columbia Circuit vacated the sections of RICE rules that allowed emergency engines to operate for emergency demand response episodes.  The vacatur went into effect on May 4, 2016.    With the vacatur, Sections 60.4211(f)(2)(ii)-(iii), 60.4243(d)(2)(ii)-(iii), and 63.6640(f)(2)(ii)-(iii), which allowed emergency engines to operate up to 100 hours per year for emergency demand response conditions described above, cease to have any legal effect.

Who Does this Apply To and What Does it Mean?

If you have a back-up generator that you operate only for emergency situations at your facility (power outage, fire, etc.) or for maintenance or testing, this rule vacatur does not apply to you and you may continue to operate your generator for those situations.   

Back-up engines that continue to operate under emergency demand response will be considered non-emergency engines and must meet the regulatory requirements including numerical emission limits, or work practice standards, notifications, and performance testing that may apply.  The applicability of these standards to a particular engine depends on the engine type, horsepower, and age.  EPA’s Regulation Navigation tool for the RICE NESHAP and NSPS can assist engine owners/operators in determining the applicable criteria and requirements for a specific engines.  The Navigation tool can be found at https://www3.epa.gov/ttn/atw/icengines/imp.html#regnav.

CLICK HERE to learn more.
Read EMAP's engine postcard mailing.